TAKEAWAY: As the two-day Power of the Tablet conference begins, follow Reed Reibstein’s live coverage of events for the first day. Follow the tweets (#poweroftablet), too!


Follow the tablet conference live here

The Power of the Tablet: How the iPad and Others are Reshaping the Digital Revolution



For the schedule for the conference, go to today’s other blog post. At the bottom of the blog post, we have reprinted a transcript of the first day’s liveblogging for easier reading.






Tweets by attendees (#poweroftablet)




INTERLUDE: World Cup 2010 pages we like


blog post image

blog post image

These pages from the Rockford Register Star show front page coverage of the World Cup 2010 in South Africa. Both demonstrate innovative visuals to present the story, and a detailed two page graphic showing all the teams involved. I bet this was a favorite with the fans.

Well done pages by Kelley Simms and the sports copy editor Adam McHugh.

“A classic take on a foosball table and the cover headline a take on the NFL slogan,” is how Kelley describes what they did.



TRANSCRIPT: Day one of “The Power of the Tablet” conference


1:50

Damon Kiesow:

Welcome to The Power Of Tablets: How the iPads and Others are Reshaping the Digital Revolution.

The seminar will be in session 2:00 - 6:00 p.m. today and 8:30 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday.

You can also follow the conversation on Twitter at #poweroftablet

We will be getting started in 10 minutes.



2:03

Damon Kiesow:

The session is opening with brief comments by Stephen Buckley, Dean of The Poynter Institute



2:05

Damon Kiesow:

co-blogging today and tomorrow will be Reed Reibstein of Garcia Media.



2:07

Damon Kiesow:

Buckley is letting the attendees know that the sessions are on the record and will be blogged with attribution. The Twitter hashtag is #poweroftablet



2:09

Damon Kiesow:

Buckley is introducing our first speaker Mario Garcia Sr., Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Garcia Media.


Mario Garcia, Sr., Garcia Media


2:10

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia’s keynote will be an introduction to the conference, a little history, the impact of the tablets and how it will play a major role for all.



2:12

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Difficult conference to prepare for because usually we present with a lot of answers and research on the subject. But, this topic could not wait.



2:15

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Recounting some of the breakthrough conferences at Poynter over the years - Color in 1985, Writing/Editing/Design in 1988, EyeTrack in 1990-2007



2:16

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: The launch of the iPad will be as important to our industry as color was in the 1980s



2:17

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Excitement, Anxiety and Ignorance surround the role of the tablet in journalism



2:18

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Cautious excitement settling in - people now looking to make money on it.



2:18

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: There is a tablet in your future.



2:19

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: A later presentation will focus on how to make money on tablets.



2:20

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Our multiplatform world will be a “quartet” - alerts on mobile phones, reports online, ink on paper the next day and also the tablet version. Media need to be there by the end of this year.



2:21

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Print is not on the way out. Read the upcoming book Hamlet’s Blackberry - coming in late June by William Powers. “Print is Eternal”



2:22

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: We will have to think ‘tablet edition’ it is a new platform with its own editor and style



2:23

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: We need to approach advertising more creatively.



2:23

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Tablets will be the platform of choice for a growing number of media users



2:24

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: We will have to develop paying strategies and content that users will pay for. “Will it Sell?” Print journalists have not faced this question before.



2:24

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: We have to continue to search for ways to make print relevant.



2:25

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Print will disappear where it is neglected. It will thrive where its role is redefined and given the respect it deserves.



2:26

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: A tablet is a brother/sister to print that online never was. Online hijacked print - editors did not understand it. It was neglected.



2:28

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: The tablet is closer to print. The tablet is a normal evolution in the development of media platforms. It is the closest you can come to the connection you have with ink and paper. It invites us to relax. It appeals to all ages. It is the perfect platform for digests. The “read later” box.



2:30

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: The tablet is NOT a newspaper. it is not a TV, or a Website. It can fulfill the role of those platforms. But it is also more.



2:32

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Designing involves beginning with information architecture. What is the DNA/blueprint of your publication. You have 10 seconds to communicate that message to readers visually. What is the MOST important thing you do?



2:33

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Begin with a storyboard. It is like a pop-up book. You can not be linear and flat. You must remind people why they have a tablet and what makes it different. Include those ‘pop-up’ moments on your storyboard/



2:34

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Design for the dynamics of the eye, the finger, the brain. Maybe the next study will be called “fingertrack”



2:35

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: three experiences - touch and read, touch and see, we need more touch and experience.



2:37

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: We have not learned to plan properly for online yet - and now we need to start learning for the tablet. Need more ‘pop-up’ moments in story planning.



2:39

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Don’t make the pop-up moment your first tablet app page. Hold it for later.



2:41

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: There is a case for editioning on tablets. Morning, noon and evening. The device is ideal for this.



2:44

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Photos play the most important role on tablets. More people access galleries of photos than videos online. Both for editorial and advertising content.



2:46

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: The tablet is the ideal platform for mini-stories. He is displaying a photo that would hot-link to information within the image.



2:48

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: You want to run your finger across a photo and find deeper information embedded/linked in the image.



2:49

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: the expectations of tablet users will be to have “pop-up"moments in every edition, even if you are publishing daily.



2:51

bmitch:

four topics of tablets: storytelling, advertising, technology, economics Garcia sez#poweroftablet



2:51

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: four topics for tablets - Storytelling, advertising, technology, economics



2:51

ctonk144:

Listening to the wisdom of Mario Garcia at Poynter’s iPad conference. A discussion he says “couldn’t wait” #poweroftablet



2:51

bmitch:

Garcia sez name an actual editor in charge of tablet edition #poweroftablet



2:53

Javier_Devilat:

#poweroftablet Tablets: Storytelling, Ad, Tech, economics



2:53

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia is giving a brief intro of the other conference presenters.



2:54

MeganWilloughby:

Storytelling, Advertising, Technology and Economics are the top four items to discuss with tablets #poweroftablet Mario Garcia



2:54

coberturamovil:

La Tablet es una plataforma más relajada y menos de noticias en tiempo real:@tweetsbydesign #poweroftablet vía earriagada@drewvigal



2:54

reginajmc:

RT @GarciaInteract: Here is the link to the live blogging from Poynter’s Power of Tablet:http://bit.ly/9tcn7M #poweroftablet



2:57

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia is taking questions from the crowd. The first is for the WiFi password in the room.



2:57

rreibstein:

Mario Garcia (@tweetsbydesign) describing #poweroftablet speakers. Today’s lineup: @jenniferbrook, D.W. Pine, Al Trivino.http://j.mp/aAhRMx



2:58

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: Sponsorship is very important here. It has never been so important in print.



2:58

Damon Kiesow:

q: who is the tablet user? Garcia: There is not really research yet. We imagine a variety of age groups. Highly educated with means. it is still an elite platform. We need more information on this.


Jennifer Brook, The New York Times


2:59

Damon Kiesow:

Up next is a Case Study: At The New York Times—Jennifer Brook, Interaction Designer, NYT: It was the New York Times’ name and recognizable features that we saw on that introduction to the iPad. Here is how it happened.



3:01

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: will be focused on how design and technology are intertwined.



3:04

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: On Jan 4 - went to California to work with Apple on the iPad project for the Times. They could not access their computers of cell phones. Went with two engineers.



3:05

Damon Kiesow:

Brook is showing a very early demo version of the Times app.



3:06

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: my job is to envision how readers will be using the device. It was a new device, no one had ever used it.



3:07

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Our first job was design a compelling demo. We also had to be prepared to build the features we demoed. That requires a lot of consideration and coordination between groups.



3:08

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: We did not have a lot of access to people to do testing. Used Apple game engineers for feedback.



3:10

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Just released an updated to the first NYT app that includes some additional sections and video.



3:10

rreibstein:

@jenniferbrook: Familiarity key in NYT app. Typography key. #poweroftablet



3:10

bmitch:

NYT’s Jennifer Brook, re NYT tablet app, urges us to read Andrew Hinton post “Courageous Redirection”: http://bit.ly/Ih3w7 #poweroftablet



3:10

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: NYT now has nine apps built for specific platforms.



3:11

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: On the next 3-5 years the demand for these types of apps will explode.



3:11

sdkstl:

NYT’s Jennifer Brook shows 1st version of Editor’s Choice iPad app. Much more complicated, much less suited to tablet. #poweroftablet



3:12

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Designing and supporting great apps requires us to be platform-centric



3:13

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Platforms like the iPad will become like little theme parks. Native languages will be required so the apps feel like they belong to the device.



3:13

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: We need to divide the conversation between web browsers and mobile apps



3:14

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Apps are not a threat to the open Web.



3:15

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Mobile Web strategy must be integrated with desktop Web strategy. Anything with a screen and an internet connection now has a browser. You can not ignore the variety and size of the many browsers.



3:16

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Apps are a huge opportunity but are not a panacea. It may not make sense yet for your organization to go this route.



3:16

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: 60% of our mobile traffic is from the NYT iPhone app.



3:17

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Designing software is nothing like designing for the Web. All of the cell platforms will likely ‘flex up’ to tablet sizes.



3:18

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: You must know the strengths of each platform you are designing for. We need to know how hard we can push against the constraints of each platform.



3:19

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: An app is not a static experience. Think of what ways your app is going to break and what that experience will be like.



3:19

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Great apps will develop over time.



3:19

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Read the iPad Human Interface Guidelines.



3:19

couch:

@jenniferbrook has extremely salient, dead-on points about app design + development in a wonderfully playful presentation. #poweroftablet



3:20

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: You can and should break the rules - but make the payoff worth the pain.



3:21

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Doing custom elements makes it more difficult to respond to changes on the platform.



3:21

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Every design choice we make has the potential to impact internal processes and software.



3:22

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Inverse relationship between user satisfaction and list of features. if you can’t meet the promise of the feature, reconsider using it.



3:22

poetabook:

#poweroftablet “designers: engineers don’t need u, the users need u” read the ipad HIG



3:23

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Great apps require unprecedented collaboration and are crafted to enhance the lives of humans.



3:23

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: The legacy structure of organizations can be the enemy of making great products. get out of your chair and talk to people.



3:25

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: We want to use tools that make us feel smarter, happier, empowered. We don’t want the tool to be smarter than us.



3:25

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: use the device you are designing for.



3:26

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Insist on reviewing the work on the device at the earliest stages - even as wireframes. Don’t provide feedback without seeing it on the device.



3:28

Damon Kiesow:

Q: Large papers can build these apps - what about smaller metros? Brook: If you are small it is a huge advantage. The size of your org can work against you. Smaller orgs can be quicker.



3:30

Damon Kiesow:

Garcia: You need a presence but not a giant presence. Do a digest version - put the best local news and columns in your app.



3:31

poetabook:

#poweroftablet “it may change again 3-5 years and we’ll have to start again.” need to stop looking for panacea and love the change



3:31

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: recommends two blog posts by John Gruber. We will try and send those links along.



3:32

Javier_Devilat:

#poweroftablet Tablets editions dont need to have all the content of the print edition. Mario Garcia



3:32

Damon Kiesow:

q: Subscription based app coming this summer? Brook: Full app by the end of the year. Not many details released yet.



3:33

Damon Kiesow:

Brook: Still figuring out the details around the full app.



3:33

rreibstein:

@jenniferbrook recommends two articles by@daringfireball http://j.mp/Gp4hX and http://j.mp/cBI8sb#poweroftablet



3:34

Damon Kiesow:

Q: Where there features left out of the Editor’s Choice app due to time? Brook: I could name at least 20. If you are not embarrassed when you ship you are doing it wrong.



3:34

Damon Kiesow:

We will be on a 25 minute break.



3:35 [Be Right Back Countdown] 20 minutes

D.W. Pine, TIME Magazine


3:55

Damon Kiesow:

Starting in a few minutes - Case Study: At TIME Magazine—DW Pine, Art Director and iPad Project Leader: Getting the venerable TIME Magazine to the tablet.



4:03

coberturamovil:

RT @dmbsarah @ rreibstein@jenniferbrook recomienda dos notas de @daringfireballhttp://j.mp/Gp4hX y http://j.mp/cBI8sb #poweroftablet



4:04

rreibstein:

About to start liveblogging the#poweroftablet conference at http://j.mp/9tcn7M, so no more tweets for a while!



4:04

poetabook:

#poweroftablet I’ve said it before but I’ve been waiting for ipad since 1991. re-imagining a 15 year multimedia project for book app



4:04

pattycox:

News Corp. doubles-down on digital distribution with acquisition of Skiffhttp://bit.ly/9XdGCR #poweroftablet



4:04

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: How TIME magazine got onto the iPad, how they’ve done after launch, and where they’ll be going by the end of the year.



4:06

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: February, 2007—created early iPhone proposal for TIME. Tried to imagine what stories might look like on a mobile device.



4:08

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Fall, 2009—begin planning for the iPad. Worked with VIIV and WonderFactory. Sports Illustrated led TIME inc. in thinking about the tablet.



4:10

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: In early sketches, tried building an interactive cover, with teasers and archived articles about the featured person.



4:11

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Early sketches used “people view,” a photo mosaic of the people in the issue, “map view,” and “writer view.”



4:14

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Other early prototype features: interactive 10 questions, photos of the week, before and after images.



4:14

myersnews:

DW Pine of Time notes at #poweroftabletthat most of the great photos don’t run in the magazine; considered using iPad to surface them.



4:17

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Steve Jobs brought the iPad to TIME Inc. TIME team had to rethink prototypes, changing them from mostly vertical to working in both orientations.



4:17

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Project Noah—40 days and 40 nights to get TIME on the iPad.



4:18

sdkstl:

Cool feature that hasn’t made it in to Time iPad app (yet): put in dates and generate a timeline in covers. #poweroftablet



4:18

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: 5 people in art department execute print magazine and iPad app. Team designed magazine in InDesign and used WoodWing’s technology to bring them to the iPad.



4:20

Reed Reibstein:

There will be more on WoodWing tomorrow at 1:45-2:30 p.m., when president Erik Schut speaks.



4:22

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Art department designs print product first. Team releases print story on Wednesday, then switch to iPad layout to design its version. Special situation when designing for the iPad because all the content has already been created.



4:23

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Art department storyboards iPad issue by printing out screens and taping to wall.



4:25

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: One week-and-a-half before launch, team went out to California to see iPad—for three-and-a-half minutes.



4:27

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: At first, team planned to rely on horizontal view and system fonts. But four days before launch, created vertical view with JPEGs of magazine pages and the text below.



4:28

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Team has now done 11 issues on the iPad. 615 print pages = 2,378 iPad pages!



4:28

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: On average, feature 30 more photographs in the app than in print.



4:31

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: TIME app also features newsfeed for the latest stories.



4:32

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Most of TIME’s design experiences are made for being viewed horizontally.



4:32

ctonk144:

Idea sparked by Time art director: If a question drives a story, can a question literally drive an iPad story as a popup? #poweroftablet



4:32

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Inspired by Sports Illustrated, the TIME app features “TimeFrames,” the five best pictures of the week.



4:34

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: TimeFrames have gotten such a great response that it may make it into the print edition.



4:34

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Provide a sit-down experience for the reader with videos.



4:36

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Still unclear if people like vertical view, as opposed to the more designed horizontal view.



4:39

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Showing off slideshow on maternal mortality. Powerfully moving.



4:43

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: iPad-only content—bring in stories from international editions of TIME, ads with streaming video.



4:44

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: For the recent Facebook cover by tomorrow’s presenter Joe Zeff, in which 1,200 profile pictures appeared, allow iPad app users to zoom in.



4:46

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: On iPad, feature first issue of TIME.



4:46

Reed Reibstein:

Here’s Joe Zeff’s blog post on the Facebook cover: http://joezeffdesign.com/blog/?p=1192.



4:47

Damon Kiesow:

Pine is showing this video:http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=134&aid=185069



4:50

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Now showing video of upcoming features in the TIME app. Video cover, map view of issue, gesture to access breaking news and sharing, interactive simulations. Many of these features seem to be those Pine mentioned the team explored in early prototypes.



4:53

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Roger Fidler about the labor for the print designers to make the iPad edition. Pine: More than likely, team will design the iPad edition more on its own.



4:54

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Need to automate as much as possible, but many of the articles are still touched by hand.



4:55

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Clay Carson about how the app is selling. Pine: Not up on number, but seems steady. Human cost to make the app, but not many more extra resources. Planning to make a subscription model with additional features.



4:58

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Dana Coester about the members of Pine’s team. Pine: Most of people in department worked on newspapers and consider themselves more journalists than designers.



4:58

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: There is no iPad editor; art department makes most of the decisions.



5:00

Reed Reibstein:

Follow-up question from Mario Garcia: “You don’t miss an iPad editor?”. Mario suggests that art departments are much more comfortable with the tablet than online.



5:01

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: Sports Illustrated is launching next week. With a technical upgrade, may need someone to plan the tablet edition.



5:02

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Roger Fidler about compromise between automation and design. “Do you concern yourself with file size?”.



5:04

Reed Reibstein:

Pine: TIME app is smaller than the WIRED app because video is streaming rather than embedded. But may begin embedding short videos for advertising .



5:05

Reed Reibstein:

Question about the upcoming features movie. Pine: Simulation created with WonderFactory.



5:07

Reed Reibstein:

Question about designing for other tablets. Pine: Team is planning for other dimensions. The iPad may be in a different size at some point.



5:08 [Be Right Back Countdown] 10 minutes

5:08

Damon Kiesow:

We will return in 10 minutes with Al Trivino


Alfredo Trivino, News Corp.

5:19

Reed Reibstein:

Starting soon: Alfredo Trivino, Creative Director, News Corp., speaks about the importance of brand, content and tailoring a unique proposition for your tablet edition.



5:20

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino’s presentation: “VISION: The iPad, the Newsbook and other new platforms. How to create the most appealing digital experience for your readers and advertisers.”



5:24

joezeffdesign:

One takeaway: responsibility for iPad development is being assigned to people with other jobs and other responsibilities.#poweroftablet



5:26

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: A journey from 2007 to 2010, thinking about news on the tablet.



5:27

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: In 2007, created the NewsBook, a tablet conceptual platform. Think about a set of finite content as a strength of the tablet.



5:28

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Showing video demo of the NewsBook. Books, applications, news, and keyboard.



5:29

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Gestures should emulate how we interact with print products.



5:31

poetabook:

#poweroftablet ereaders restore the “happy ending” to reading experience



5:31

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Why go to the tablet version of The Times in the morning? Because there will be unique content.



5:32

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: By noon, The Times changes. Taste of stories of the day, plus big breaking news.



5:33

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: In the evening, try a lighter version, but still news-heavy. This is editioning, a concept that Mario Garcia spoke about in the keynote.



5:34

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Different versions of The Times—Times 1 (public newspaper), Times 2 (intimate), Times 3 (independent content and index).



5:36

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Emphasizing navigation on the tablet. In early prototypes, use rudimentary bar chart.



5:36

GarciaInteract:

Al Trivino: iPad experience should be tangible. Users should know how much there is to consume and when they are done.#poweroftablet



5:37

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Use tablet to present stories more effectively, with video and interactive graphics. In early stages, use templates, but in future, will have to edit for the tablet.



5:39

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Showing off accessibility ideas. Speech, smells (ink!), active glass surface (for Braille).



5:39

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: All this was from three years ago. In 2009, work with plastic e-ink reader.



5:41

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Working on black and white tablet, allow return to control for designer, e.g. typography. Digital designers, in contrast, love the lack of control of the web.



5:42

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: The Times’ app is an evolution of the early prototypes.



5:43

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Placing print or the web on the tablet is only a temporary solution. Tablets are a liquid medium in which all kinds of content merge.



5:43

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Customers want tactile, intuitive content.



5:44

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Tablets combine “the muscle of mobile and the heart and brains of print.”



5:45

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Users want to read, view, listen, store, search, and share.



5:46

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: In The Times’ app, try to deliver an organic, tangible journey.



5:47

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: A journey is linear, with a rhythm and definite ending. Serendipity key.



5:49

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Create a journey for “diggers”—non-linear, never-ending, with your friends as editors.



5:51

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Third journey is a hands-free journey. Sit back and watch.



5:51

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Tablet allows return to print-like grid, typography, architecture, proportions, and rhythms.



5:52

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: For Times app, create grid with several dozen micro-columns.



5:54

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Even though content comes from the RSS feeds, create a flow for the articles.



5:55

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Per Apple’s suggestion, 2D is more effective for presenting content on the iPad than 3D.



5:56

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Now delivering content, but still missing context and community.



5:57

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Still trying to figure out navigation between stories.



6:00

Reed Reibstein:

Trivino: Conclusions—about brands, not about platforms; about content, not about fireworks; about tailoring content to the tablet for a fee, not about free content.



6:02

Reed Reibstein:

Question about the sizes on which content will appear. Trivino: Content is key, so any size can work.



6:05

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Alan Oakley about whether traditional newspaper design will remain as multimedia becomes more important. Trivino: Design goes beyond aesthetics; about how to tell the story with available elements. Need to use different languages of journalism to tell different stories.



6:07

Reed Reibstein:

Question about what content should go on which platform, in light of paywalls. Trivino: Current Times app is the content from the day’s paper. Start with same content, but use platform to add unique experiences.



6:09

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Joe Zeff about comparatively high price of Times app ($17). Trivino: Numbers may be less, but benefits will be more.



6:11

Reed Reibstein:

Follow-up from Zeff about limitations of platforms given Trivino’s imaginative prototypes. Trivino: Thrive on limitations. Need to know the direction that you are going before begin.



6:13

sdkstl:

A #poweroftablet attendee went to download Times app, startled by $17/month price. News Int’s Trivino: looking for quality, not volume,



6:13

Reed Reibstein:

Question from Dana Coester about whether tablets are actually break from print. Trivino: Print will become a luxury product, highly crafted, perhaps with glossy paper. Collectible print editions another possibility. While tablets are great for commuting, print has something to offer for enjoyable reading experience.



6:13

Damon Kiesow:

We will reconvene at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday with a presentation by Roger Fidler: The Evolution of the Tablet



6:14

Reed Reibstein:

Thanks for joining us.




comments powered by Disqus